New answer to What is the biggest lesson you have learned in the corporate world?”

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New answer to ““What is the biggest les­son you have learned in the cor­por­ate world?””

New Answer
What is the biggest les­son you have learned in the cor­por­ate world?
Rishi Mehta
Rishi Mehta, Lec­turer in Psy­cho­logy Depart­ment
1 view
Cor­por­ate Sec­tor is the field of cold war. Even though every­body of us spend max­im­um time of our day with the people in our office we hardly get attached to them. Why so? its because in your office nobody thins about you.Maximum people sur­round­ing you are Selfish.Its top­most real­ity of the cor­por­ate world.
You will nev­er get a boss that wants you to learn more & take over him/her.
Romance in cor­por­ate world often end with dev­ast­at­ing res­ults-It can even cost you your Job.
Its the fact you are always you are always replace­able. Your tal­ents or skills are company’s require­ment not you.
You nev­er have friends here. You can have good col­leagues , you might have feel­ings for them but you will find it dif­fi­cult to acknow­ledge them as friends.
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New Answer
What is the biggest les­son you have learned in the cor­por­ate world?
Ravi Pra­tap
Ravi Pra­tap, Ms Bab­ul Construction.Pvt.Ltd
1 view
Lead­er­ship is a qual­ity that you can teach your­self.
Most people who are good at school fol­low a pretty straight­for­ward strategy: study hard, get good grades, repeat. This basic approach to achieve­ment stays the same from ele­ment­ary school all the way through col­lege. But while school is stra­tegic­ally sim­ple, busi­ness is among the most com­plex of games. It’s not always clear how people get ahead. When I was work­ing at a con­sult­ing firm right after col­lege, I noticed that the most suc­cess­ful ana­lysts and man­agers seemed to spend most of their time pitch­ing new cli­ents rather than work­ing on pro­jects. This gave me pause. Why were the best ana­lysts spend­ing so little time on their cur­rent cli­ents? Was I focus­ing too nar­rowly on my lim­ited range of tasks? And most import­antly, how was my role pre­par­ing me to do any­thing oth­er than that same job? These kinds of ques­tions are con­fron­ted by many tal­en­ted young people as they nav­ig­ate the early stages of their careers. Luck­ily, there are steps recent gradu­ates can take to help pre­pare them­selves for lead­er­ship roles. But first, it’s help­ful to take a look at exactly what lead­er­ship means in the world of work. Mak­ing decisions is harder than it looks Most people hired straight out of school are assessed primar­ily on their smarts and work eth­ic. Entry-level law­yers, bankers, soft­ware developers, mar­keters, and pro­fes­sion­als in many oth­er indus­tries begin their careers in some kind of appren­tice pos­i­tion. They cut their teeth crank­ing away at the tasks they are assigned, with rel­at­ively little autonomy. This is a tough phase, but it retains much of the stra­tegic sim­pli­city of school. You can do well just by work­ing hard and doing what your man­ager tells you. But after this ini­tial stage, you have to show that you can do more than fol­low instruc­tions in order to keep mov­ing up. Once people become man­agers, their com­mu­nic­a­tion and organ­iz­a­tion­al skills are weighted more heav­ily than sim­ple pro­ductiv­ity. The work is too big for one per­son to accom­plish at that point. Man­agers must be able to steer the more com­plex ini­ti­at­ives with many mov­ing parts. Once people become man­agers, their com­mu­nic­a­tion and organ­iz­a­tion­al skills are weighted more heav­ily than sim­ple pro­ductiv­ity. Young people may be puzzled by the lack of fixed rules in many work­places. In school, you’re expec­ted to prove that you know how to fol­low instruc­tions and give teach­ers exactly what they’ve asked for. Many con­tem­por­ary busi­nesses, how­ever, rely on innov­a­tion” to suc­ceed. We cel­eb­rate the people who dream up new ways to form a com­pany, deliv­er a pro­duct, or even pay their employ­ees. Screw the rules. Com­pan­ies also expect work­ers to flex some ser­i­ous decision-mak­ing muscles as they climb the lad­der. The per­cent­age of things that are already decided for you goes way down, and you must make up the dif­fer­ence. As the decision-maker, you are account­able for the out­comes — good and bad. This level of account­ab­il­ity can be stress­ful for even the strongest thinkers, since most of us have more exper­i­ence form­ing opin­ions than we do mak­ing big decisions. Even a former straight-A stu­dent has prob­ably nev­er faced such a high risk of fail­ure. I’ve seen a lot of inex­per­i­enced man­agers cope with the risk and uncer­tainty of decision-mak­ing by hedging rather than tak­ing a firm stance on an issue. I used this tac­tic a lot after I left the con­sult­ing firm to join a soft­ware star­tup. Being so close to the big decisions of a com­pany at age 23 was cool, but also a little unnerv­ing for me. A lot of inex­per­i­enced man­agers cope with the risk and uncer­tainty of decision-mak­ing by hedging. Thank­fully, the CEO mer­ci­lessly called me out whenev­er I tried to hedge a recom­mend­a­tion. If I said that a can­did­ate was good,” he would coun­ter with, So you’re say­ing we should hire her?” If I remarked that a new fea­ture could help our pro­duct, he’d respond, So you’re say­ing we should invest in it?” After a while, the les­son sank in. Ideas and opin­ions were nice, but the busi­ness moved on decisions. I needed to think ideas through and make decisions rather than pass the buck. I needed to grow up. Think like a lead­er from the start Even the most intense appren­tice­ship phase isn’t designed to endow you with lead­er­ship skills. That’s why you should find ways to develop these skills on your own, as soon as you get your feet wet. Here is some advice I’ve given to the people I’ve man­aged take over the years: Think big. Make sure you under­stand in a deep way how you cre­ate value for the busi­ness. Wheth­er you’re pour­ing over Excel spread­sheets or doing cler­ic­al work, you should be mak­ing con­nec­tions between your imme­di­ate tasks and their broad­er out­comes. When you under­stand why cer­tain tasks mat­ter, you’re in a bet­ter pos­i­tion to set pri­or­it­ies — which in turn will help pre­pare you to trans­ition into man­age­ment. Plus, you’ll get prac­tice under­stand­ing how dif­fer­ent roles con­trib­ute to the company’s suc­cess in a lar­ger con­text. That’s a neces­sary skill for people who want to be effect­ive man­agers and help their team mem­bers grow as indi­vidu­als. Find oppor­tun­it­ies to speak up with new ideas. Part of being a stew­ard of the busi­ness is bring­ing new oppor­tun­it­ies and ideas to the table. You don’t need to be a man­ager to do that. Remem­ber that voicing new ideas involves some risk, but part of becom­ing a lead­er is hon­ing your risk tol­er­ance so that you know when to hold back and when to bet big. Part of becom­ing a lead­er is hon­ing your risk tol­er­ance. Start with what you know best. I increased my own con­fid­ence early in my career by identi­fy­ing small improve­ments to my company’s soft­ware. I gradu­ally got bolder as I intern­al­ized our strategy and under­stood the tech­no­logy. Don’t settle for just intro­du­cing a good idea; you need to learn what it takes to see that idea all the way through from con­cept to execution.Remember, even the best ideas usu­ally need help get­ting over the goal line. Get com­fort­able with debate and con­flict. When I became a man­ager, I wasn’t pre­pared for how much time and energy I’d have to spend explain­ing and defend­ing my decisions. Not only do you have to own your out­comes, you also have to be your own PR per­son. Every ques­tion and com­plaint now lands in your inbox or knocks on your door, and the more decisions you make, the more knocks you get. Many times I asked myself, Why did they give me the respons­ib­il­ity if they’re going to ques­tion every decision I make?” The truth is that while I was occa­sion­ally micro­man­aged, my col­leagues often had legit­im­ate con­cerns, bet­ter ideas, or were jus try­ing to bet­ter under­stand my reas­on­ing. New man­agers often grumble about how all the meet­ings and e-mails make their job harder without real­iz­ing that, to a large extent, com­mu­nic­a­tion is their job. Early on, learn not to shy away from debate or stand­ing up for your ideas. Emer­ging as a lead­er in any organ­iz­a­tion doesn’t just intro­duce the pos­sib­il­ity of con­flict — it guar­an­tees it. Every­one in a com­pany has their own know­ledge, exper­i­ences, biases, and blind spots. It is inev­it­able that some of your ideas will clash with the ideas of oth­ers. So early on, learn not to shy away from debate. The more prac­tice you get nav­ig­at­ing these healthy kinds of con­flict, the less ener­vat­ing you’ll find it when you start encoun­ter­ing dis­agree­ment more reg­u­larly. The upshot These tips all have two big things in com­mon. To be a suc­cess­ful lead­er, you have to learn to con­sider how your work affects oth­ers, and how to work with people to get things done. The higher up you go in any organ­iz­a­tion, the harder it is to get things done on your own. So invest in build­ing rela­tion­ships every step of the way, and you’ll have more people who want to see you suc­ceed when your time comes.
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New Answer
What is the biggest les­son you have learned in the cor­por­ate world?
Gaurav Bamezai
Gaurav Bamezai, Just your reg­u­lar next door neigh­bor with an uncon­ven­tion­al knack of ques­tion­ing
1 view
Every­body is look­ing to secure their job and play it safe at the end of the day. So don’t expect your col­leagues to stand up for you, in case you are in deep shit.
Nev­er com­mu­nic­ate or receive any­thing verbally. Always have it doc­u­mented, prefer­ably in the form of e-mails so that when time comes, you can dis­play the same emails as the proof of com­mu­nic­a­tion.
Money is the biggest motiv­at­or. Not the nature of work, not the dazzling infra­struc­ture, not the awe­some­ness of col­leagues. Unless, of course, you are work­ing for com­pan­ies like Tesla that are shap­ing the future of auto­mo­biles or Inter­net of Things that is chan­ging the way how we are com­mu­nic­at­ing with almost every equip­ment in our house.
Ass-kiss­ing is real. Not lit­er­ally but you will real­ize it.
The mag­nitude of polit­ics increases with each step you take on the cor­por­ate lad­der. Per­haps one of the many reas­ons why people at higher man­age­ment levels rarely share a good camarader­ie with their col­leagues.
Your organ­iz­a­tion does not love you. Peri­od. It has hired you to meet the dead­lines, com­plete the pro­jects so that money can be made and is, in turn, giv­ing you a salary. Your resig­na­tion will not open the floodgates on your organ­iz­a­tion. You can always be replaced unless you are doing some­thing which nobody else on this earth can do.
Flings between bosses and their sec­ret­ar­ies or oth­er female associates/employees are real. Most know it and choose to not give a shit about it unless it dir­ectly or indir­ectly implic­ates them. So should you.
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